Hand Tools

Subject:
Re: confusion
Response To:
confusion ()

David Weaver
http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/readarticle.pl?dir=newarticles&file=articles_958.shtml

note the pictures - the v11 chisel took a surprising amount of damage, but it was chipping (not folding), of course.

The AI chisel results were great, but it appears I got a little into the wheel at the tip, so not sure if that's a fair comparison - see the 32 degree result, though. AI did better than V11 (O1 and lower hardness, both by spec and by what the stones told me - the AI is very close to its 61 spec).

Both of these steels have similar toughness rankings.

The japanese steel is white steel - it is lower toughness. See the bottom picture. It's better at 32 degrees and unicorn - at 30, it had a fairly negative reaction (it's a bit harder than the V11, but not by much. Maybe a couple of points - I've definitely had harder japanese chisels, as well as softer).

This chisel is a middle of the road japanese chisel, so I doubt it got more attention than hand done hardening and temp cycling that came only as part of forging (not optimized, and forging is generally done to set the bit and then to shape and that's it). That's to say, I've had japanese chisels that hold an edge better than these, but that improvement above is only a little.

52100 has the potential to do much better in harsh tests than O1, which means it has the potential to go far above V11 (and carries that potential into very high hardness). The drawback to it is that it decarbs, so post heat treat grinding would be necessary for that - and it warps. But it's cheap. It also sharpens easy. It has the strength that carbon steels have, but also high toughness that you tend to find in steels that optimize hardness at a lower level than I'm looking for (e.g., 80CrV is very tough, makes a great knife, but really does its best around 59 hardness. I'm not warming the forge for something 59 hardness - there are a million chisels on the market already for cheap that do that range just fine).

© 1998 - 2017 by Ellis Walentine. All rights reserved.
No parts of this web site may be reproduced in any form or by
any means without the written permission of the publisher.

WOODCENTRAL, P.O. BOX 493, SPRINGTOWN, PA 18081