Hand Tools

Subject:
This isn't a snarky response, by the way

David Weaver
the previous response, that is. I don't read historical books about sawing or planing, and came to my conclusions on tools, handle orientation, etc, by using them and making them to use (ability to dimension is essential for me - it clears my brain and without it, I wouldn't be woodworking).

The planing position that you mention has a lot to do with explaining a straight up handle. I would never get low enough to do it. When I first started sawing and planing (more than just joints, breaking down boards), I felt like I would have 15 or 20 minutes of planing in me and then have to take a break. Over time, I worked into what I'm doing now because it allows me not only to work just as fast (control of the plane and planing, I actually work much faster) - I can do it for several hours in a given day, and then do it again the next day and feel not a whole lot, and as you can see - i'm kind of fat (a little under 210).

My first planing video was from david charlesworth. He talked about old timers swishing planes around on boards and ruining flatness, then seized most of his body like a statue and walked with the plane. Over time, I've worked on trying to make planing more of a natural motion, like a brisk walk, and correcting personal habits at the near and far end of a long jointed board. Whatever people are doing when they hunch down and get really low isn't sustainable, just as the idea of someone demonstrating a saw and leaning almost chest to waist parallel to the floor isn't sustainable. They're holding their whole body up on one arm to try to do something that isn't that physically involved with another.

When anyone starts to put a couple of hours a week in in earnest dimensioning, things change and a lot of what's taught or demonstrated now makes no sense. 2 or 3 hours of planing and sawing in a given day and I've had enough. If I could do 2 hours of it every day, i'd bet I wouldn't be so fat. But if I lowered 6 or 8 inches every time I started a planing stroke, I would soon run out of legs to do the work, just as my arms would be spent in 10 minutes if I laid out horizontal to rip wood.

Once this experience is accumulated and you start counting how much volume you get done in a period of time vs. how you'll feel after it, it becomes pretty clear why everything is made the way it's made. It's a brisk walk, and not bracing for a rugby scrum. We lean over planing for enough bracing to keep us from getting stuck straight up if we run into a tough spot. I like a stanley plane much better than a coffin smoother for finer work, which leads to a question as to why that may be - I think they'd have sold well in 1775 if they existed, but not for much other than smoothing and trimming.

Messages In This Thread

Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
Re: Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
Re: Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
finger pressure...
Side sharpening
Re: Side sharpening
Re: Side sharpening
Ruler trick
in plane iron testing, I found two options..
Re: in plane iron testing, I found two options..
testing high angles..
side comment about planing in general..
I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Re: I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Re: I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Patience ...
I re-read the articles on COE
High benches and low benches
Re: High benches and low benches
This isn't a snarky response, by the way
Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Where I am going....
by the way...
I risk offending a lot of people...
Re: Others who do ..
on the last bit...
One other case for effort...
Something precise.
Re: Initially flat
Rotary tool?
Re: Rotary tool?
Some context
Re: Some context
Re: Some context
A failed attempt *PIC*
Re: A failed attempt
Re: A failed attempt
this is a lie nielsen iron?
Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
That pretty much covers it...
Success with applying extra pressure near the edge *PIC*
Directed pressure and progressive work
Re: Success with applying extra pressure near the
Wear bevel *PIC*
Visual difference at the back edge of..
Re: Visual difference at the back edge of..
Sorry, I should've been more precise...
Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade *PIC*
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
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