Hand Tools

Subject:
One other case for effort...

David Weaver
Once in a while, I get enamored with something and use it for a while. I have two superb metal jointers (an old almost unused record 8, and an I. Sorby 7). When the whole plane test thing went down, I made XHP irons for them, and then used them to do jointing and trying work for a little bit. When the wood gets really really hard (like macassar ebony), that kind of wood can knock the set out of a wooden plane. I was making a couple of guitars at the time, so they worked great.

When I went back to the cherry cabinet, I was still using them (and noticed that they got beat up in rough work - the XHP irons - more than they did in what is essentially lots of jointing and truing on guitar parts, but little rough lumber). The shaving size issue metal vs. wood became apparent again - I could not physically get the same thickness of shaving out of the metal jointers as I can with the wooden planes - as long as the wood is agreeable enough to be pleasant with wooden planes (ash/beech and below is kind of the cutoff for this, but they work rosewood fine - rosewood is sort of a special case - it planes more easily than its janka hardness would suggest, just as heavy planing in hard maple is more difficult than its rating would suggest).

No matter how often I wax a metal plane, I cannot get the same amount of work done in the pre-smoother shavings as I can with a wooden plane that isn't really getting waxed at all (unless the work is sticky pine - then waxing is periodic).

I do think that if there was an efficiency to be gained by moving the weight to the bottom of planes, it would've been done long ago by trimming the unneeded wood from the top of a wooden plane and setting the handle in lower. I've used razee planes - they leave a lot to be desired vs. a typical beech smoother.

I'll test bevel up vs. bevel down plane on the high SG cocobolo to see which results in the thickest practical shaving that I can take (high angle vs close set cap iron and no tearout).

my 4-12 pound comment above comes from butting an infill panel plane against a stop and putting it on a postal scale and then pushing the plane with one hand into the stop after taring the scale. It's not a perfect test, but the harder you push forward (without pushing down), the higher the rotational force and the higher the reading on the scale.

Certainly welcome to other peoples' opinions about whether or not planes should have the bulk of their weight set low - I don't think it makes a practical difference - the rotation can be kept the same just by putting the same type of handle on a BU plane - doing heavier work without that rotational force is a no go, and taking away the centered feeling of the plane makes the plane feel less nimble to me, and harder to sense vertical (a big deal if you're dimensioning by hand or jointing edges). I can't feel vertical well with japanese planes, either.

Messages In This Thread

Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
Re: Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
Re: Creating a mini-ura with buffing wheel?
finger pressure...
Side sharpening
Re: Side sharpening
Re: Side sharpening
Ruler trick
in plane iron testing, I found two options..
Re: in plane iron testing, I found two options..
testing high angles..
side comment about planing in general..
I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Re: I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Re: I'll demonstrate thick sometime ..
Patience ...
I re-read the articles on COE
High benches and low benches
Re: High benches and low benches
This isn't a snarky response, by the way
Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Re: Others who do ..
Where I am going....
by the way...
I risk offending a lot of people...
Re: Others who do ..
on the last bit...
One other case for effort...
Something precise.
Re: Initially flat
Rotary tool?
Re: Rotary tool?
Some context
Re: Some context
Re: Some context
A failed attempt *PIC*
Re: A failed attempt
Re: A failed attempt
this is a lie nielsen iron?
Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
Re: Stanley iron
That pretty much covers it...
Success with applying extra pressure near the edge *PIC*
Directed pressure and progressive work
Re: Success with applying extra pressure near the
Wear bevel *PIC*
Visual difference at the back edge of..
Re: Visual difference at the back edge of..
Sorry, I should've been more precise...
Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade *PIC*
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
Re: Mini-ura on a new Veritas blade
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