Hand Tools

Subject:
Scratches from various compounds *PIC*

Winston
With the talk about stropping and compounds, I decided to see what the scratches look like from different compounds.

This time I started off with an edge from a Sigma Power Ceramic 6000. I again didn't do anything to the back, so if you look closely, you can see a bit of burr hanging on (it's quite a bit darker).

I wanted to start with a smooth surface before trying out the other compounds, so I first buffed it with the white rouge.

I have a leather strop with (supposedly) 1 micron diamond paste on it, so I stropped it maybe five times at a higher angle. This is unbranded diamond paste I bought on eBay about 10 years ago. I remember that it was very inexpensive.

A little background before the next pictures. I recently bought a strop that came with two compounds: a coarser white aluminum oxide which is supposedly 1 micron, and a green aluminum oxide that's supposedly 0.5 micron. I haven't put either compound on the strop yet.

First, I buffed the blade with the white rouge to get a smooth surface. Then, I dragged the blade backward on the stick of green aluminum oxide compound a few times.

Finally, the white aluminum oxide. This is the same stuff I had used before with a buffing wheel, but for consistency, I just used the stick directly this time. I buffed the blade smooth again, and then dragged the blade backward on the white stick a few times.

I should say again that the blade seemed extremely sharp after all of these steps. It's possible that for the unicorn grind, the scratch size doesn't matter much for durability, but that it's the rounded edge profile that really matters.

So far, the white rouge has left by far the smoothest surface. Apparently, the abrasives aren't as hard as others. Here's one description I found: "White rouge: An extremely dry grade of compound made with ultra-fine, soft abrasive powders. Produces a clear, brilliant, mirror-like finish on chromium, stainless, carbon steel, brass and aluminum."

So maybe the reason it's leaving such a smooth surface is because it's softer, compared to abrasives like diamond and aluminum oxide. On something that's hand "powered" like a strop, you might want a very hard abrasive so that it works quickly, but on a powered buffing wheel, a softer, slower abrasive is still plenty fast for working on a tiny region like this, and will leave a smoother surface. (The drill I used for this can do 1600 rpm, and with a 4" wheel, that's a surface speed of 28 feet per second. A 6" bench buffer has a surface speed of 94 feet per second.)

Messages In This Thread

Sharpening and buffing progression pictures *PIC*
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Suzuki Tool 4000
eek...expensive..
judging scratches
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Thinking about establishing the Unicorn profile
Amen, Reverend
Re: Amen, Reverend
for testing plane blade durability..
Tormek
Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Preparing a beading blade
Re: Preparing a beading blade
if the tormek had a higher speed leather wheel...
David & Winston
Re: David & Winston
Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Re: Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Re: Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Scratches from various compounds *PIC*
these results will require some study
The white stuff is...
Re: The white stuff is...
various compounds - difficult to judge
Re: various compounds - difficult to judge
Thank you for experimenting
looking forward to...
Further Observations
great work
Interesting..
Re: Interesting..
not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
I remember reading this...
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Factory ground *PIC*
Re: Factory ground
Re: Factory ground 1816 *PIC*
Re: Factory ground 1816
Re: Factory ground 1816 *PIC*
Re: Factory ground 1816
blogger grind
Re: blogger grind *PIC*
you're still failing...
after you do your survey, you'll find
Marples catalog...
Some other things to try
I am anxious to try your suggestion *NM*
Re: Some other things to try
Re: Some other things to try
Re: Some other things to try
Scratches from more compounds; buff vs stick *PIC*
Re: Scratches from more compounds; buff vs stick
wait till you try...
great experiments
Re: great experiments *PIC*
Other Compounds
Re: Other Compounds *PIC*
Well! good work
partly my fault for voluminous posts..
Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Thanks, Jon!!
Re: Wooden planes—Steve Voigt link *LINK*
hardness of iron oxide
Re: hardness of iron oxide
Google monster says
Red stuff
File in useless knowledge
Re: Other Compounds - reinventing the wheel...
will do...
Correction
Calcined alumina *PIC*
sounds like gunpowder...
Profile pictures *PIC*
Capturing the Unicorn Profile
Re: Capturing the Unicorn Profile
but, do I need to?
Outstanding work, Winston! *NM*
Re: Capturing the Unicorn Profile
Angle near the edge *PIC*
Re: Angle near the edge
Re: Angle near the edge
Re: Angle near the edge
This is a difficult thing to do precisely
Thoughts on the data
Re: Thoughts on the data
Scale of Image
Comparative Profile Pictures
I have never looked closely at...
Re: Comparative Profile Pictures
Re: Comparative Profile Pictures
Separate on the IH sorby chisels..
If the UK guys are correct...
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