Hand Tools

Subject:
Sharpening and buffing progression pictures *PIC*

Winston
The pictures I've posted seem to have been well received, so I thought I'd post some more pictures of what I've seen experimenting with buffing. No edge sharpness or durability tests here, but this might be of interest anyway to sharpening nerds.

I got a new buffing wheel. The previous one was a soft cotton wheel. The new one is a sisal wheel, which is much stiffer and coarser. Here's a drill with the new wheel.

I used the Buck Brothers chisel. First, I honed the bevel side on a Shapton Pro 1000. This is what the bevel side looks like. I didn't work the back, so there's a big burr.

Next, I moved to a Suzuki Tool 4000. I again only did the bevel and didn't touch the back.

Here's the back. You can see that the burr looks pretty ragged.

Next, I used the buffing wheel. This time, I used a different compound which was advertised as being 1 micron aluminum oxide, but I think it's actually much coarser than that, for reasons we'll see.

Here's the bevel side after a few seconds buffing with the sisal wheel and this white compound. (There are two pictures because the angle of lighting makes a huge difference in what you can see.)

The edge is obviously much more uniform than before, but still, it's not perfect.

Compared to my previous tests with the softer wheel and white rouge that came in the Ryobi set, the rounded bevel region is smaller. In the previous tests, the area near the edge was completely smooth (as far as could be seen with my scope), but this time there are visible scratches near the edge.

At this point, I had not touched the back. When I felt it, it seemed like there was still a significant burr, but it turns out it was mostly buffing compound that had accumulated on the back, as you can see here.

If there was a burr left on it, it was small enough that it wasn't visible at this magnification.

I buffed the bevel side of the chisel again, hoping to work out the scratches near the edge. However, even after a few more seconds of buffing, there were still visible scratches. I should note that I don't know if the scratches affect edge durability or ease of cutting.

At this point, I decided to use another sisal wheel (I bought a 2-pack), but with the white rouge that I used before, instead of the new white aluminum oxide. It turns out this did a good job removing the scratches. The surface near the edge looked significantly smoother.

I buffed it for a few more seconds, and it ended up being almost completely smooth. It was actually hard to focus the camera, because there were almost no visible features to focus on. In the picture below, I think the white lines are oil from my fingers.

This the edge at a higher magnification -- I used the 10x instead of the 4x objective used for the other pictures.

Some things I learned from all this:

- The harder wheel results in a smaller rounded region. It's also probably easier to control the resulting angle near the edge by changing the angle that the chisel is presented to the wheel, but I don't specifically test that, and it's difficult to see the angle. (It's possible that a bench buffer with a softer 6" or 8" wheel might behave similarly to this stiff 4" wheel on a drill -- I think that the greater diameter and RPMs would make it behave like a stiffer wheel due to greater centrifugal force.)

- The new aluminum oxide buffing compound that I got was probably much coarser than the 1 micron it was advertised as.

- The finer buffing compound (white rouge), leaves a visibly smoother surface and doesn't take noticeably longer than the coarser stuff. I don't know if the smoother surface necessarily results in better durability, but since there's no drawback to using the finer compound (as far as I can see), it makes sense to just use it.

- The burr from sharpening on stones is almost entirely removed by buffing just the bevel side. If a burr still remained, it was smaller than I could see through the microscope.

I should mention that the chisel seemed extremely sharp after all of these stages of buffing, in terms of how it felt and how easily it shaved hairs. However, I didn't do any real testing of sharpness or edge durability.

Messages In This Thread

Sharpening and buffing progression pictures *PIC*
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Suzuki Tool 4000
eek...expensive..
judging scratches
Re: Sharpening and buffing progression pictures
Thinking about establishing the Unicorn profile
Amen, Reverend
Re: Amen, Reverend
for testing plane blade durability..
Tormek
Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Re: Clarification, please
Preparing a beading blade
Re: Preparing a beading blade
if the tormek had a higher speed leather wheel...
David & Winston
Re: David & Winston
Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Re: Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Re: Buffing wheel vs hard felt
Scratches from various compounds *PIC*
these results will require some study
The white stuff is...
Re: The white stuff is...
various compounds - difficult to judge
Re: various compounds - difficult to judge
Thank you for experimenting
looking forward to...
Further Observations
great work
Interesting..
Re: Interesting..
not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
I remember reading this...
Re: not sure I agree
Re: not sure I agree
Factory ground *PIC*
Re: Factory ground
Re: Factory ground 1816 *PIC*
Re: Factory ground 1816
Re: Factory ground 1816 *PIC*
Re: Factory ground 1816
blogger grind
Re: blogger grind *PIC*
you're still failing...
after you do your survey, you'll find
Marples catalog...
Some other things to try
I am anxious to try your suggestion *NM*
Re: Some other things to try
Re: Some other things to try
Re: Some other things to try
Scratches from more compounds; buff vs stick *PIC*
Re: Scratches from more compounds; buff vs stick
wait till you try...
great experiments
Re: great experiments *PIC*
Other Compounds
Re: Other Compounds *PIC*
Well! good work
partly my fault for voluminous posts..
Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Re: Wooden planes
Thanks, Jon!!
Re: Wooden planes—Steve Voigt link *LINK*
hardness of iron oxide
Re: hardness of iron oxide
Google monster says
Red stuff
File in useless knowledge
Re: Other Compounds - reinventing the wheel...
will do...
Correction
Calcined alumina *PIC*
sounds like gunpowder...
Profile pictures *PIC*
Capturing the Unicorn Profile
Re: Capturing the Unicorn Profile
but, do I need to?
Outstanding work, Winston! *NM*
Re: Capturing the Unicorn Profile
Angle near the edge *PIC*
Re: Angle near the edge
Re: Angle near the edge
Re: Angle near the edge
This is a difficult thing to do precisely
Thoughts on the data
Re: Thoughts on the data
Scale of Image
Comparative Profile Pictures
I have never looked closely at...
Re: Comparative Profile Pictures
Re: Comparative Profile Pictures
Separate on the IH sorby chisels..
If the UK guys are correct...
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