Hand Tools Archive

Subject:
Re: Dia-Sharp Extra-Extra-Fine Question

Wiley Horne
Hi Pat,

The D8EE started as a luxury for me, but has become the go-to stone. If something happened to this one I’ve had for a long time, I’d buy another immediately.

The main reason that stone is important for me is alloy blades. It works well for light alloy like O-1. But when you get to A2 or PM V11, it’s the difference between really sharp in 20 seconds, or using quite a bit of elbow grease.

Particularly when the flats start growing (I hollow grind). What I find is that right off the hollow grind, I can get a keen edge quickly with almost any stone, but as the flats start growing, the alloy gets tougher to tame, and that’s when D8EE shines. My experience with DMT had been quick-dying stones, but this one has lasted since Jan. 2018. It has settled in, as David said, but not lost cutting power. If anything, it’s a little too brash when brand new, for an 8K stone.

I have begun to change several irons to PMV11, specifically because of the way they match up with D8EE. It will handle higher alloy too, like CPM 3V and M2, but I don’t expect many others have those.

The stone is quick. I like it for gouges, for example.

I keep a spray bottle of water nearby, for water stones, and use it for the diamond stone as well. I have cut the diamonds right off a couple of DMT Diasharp, from dry sharpening alloy on them. BTW, I’m not a fan of DMT—have generally not had good experience with them. But this stone is different, particularly using a cutting fluid (water).

Why did I buy it to begin with? It was because I understood Bill T. some time ago saying that the carving instructor Mary May used the stone on her gouges—maybe I got that wrong, but if so it was a happy mistake.

I strop with 0.5u graded green after the diamond stone, and agree with David’s remarks on the benefits of stropping after diamond.

Wiley

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