Hand Tools Archive

Subject:
Re: suitable...
Response To:
Re: Question? ()

david weaver
I should've probably clarified what I mean by that.

Not suitable means not as good for, at least that's how I meant it. I see how it could be taken as "not good enough for at all".

I did all of my heavy work with single iron planes back when I was a fanboy. I had a single iron jack and a nice JT brown single iron jointer bedded at 50 degrees.

It's just much faster to do the work with a double iron at common pitch. There's less resistance and more tearout protection. I had to sharpen the JT more often (which isn't a big deal because it was single iron), and it had less ability to stay in the cut (thank goodness kees did that study to actually prove that or I'd be excoriated for saying it).

If nobody else ever said anything about double irons other than warren and I never figured it out, I'd still be using them. It was just a little less easy to and took a little longer.

I'm not sure where Larry got some of his ideas about the double iron, but they are definitely coast to coast AM quality. I'm pretty sure with a day and some lumber to mill start to finish, I could convince him (well, I don't think he's looking for convincing!).

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