Trivia

Subject:
Re: Dvorak
Response To:
Correct! ()

Ed in Leaside
"Just out of curiosity, did you learn to type on a Dvorak, or did you make the switch from QWERTY, and how hard was the switch?"

I didn't start to learn to type until 40, so nothing was, or even is, deeply embedded. I found out about different layouts from the 'teaching typing' program I was using. Of course, starting as a hunt & peck typist, I began with QWERTY as on the older boards you couldn't swap the keys around. I honestly think I'd be a better typist today if I'd started with Dvorak, because I wouldn't have been able to hunt & peck on QWERTY.

I switched the at-home keyboard over about 10 years ago, when I was 55, and no I didn't find it too difficult. I was going to say it's somewhat like learning another language, but really I think it's more learning Yoda-speak. Everything is the same, just switched around. Or should I say: Just switched around, everything is the same. Or just say "muscle memory" so yes easy. :-)

The at-the-workshop keyboard is still QWERTY. I'd switch that one too but, I'm in print graphics, sometimes a client needs the board. I've a newer Mac going into the workshop in a few weeks and I will install it with a hardwired Dvorak board & wireless QWERTY for clients. Actually it's really easy to swap on-the-fly on a Mac with an 'input menu on the menu bar' it's just one click.

That's probably more than you were asking ...

BTW, I was gifted a broken right wrist (dominant) Friday afternoon and typed this with my left. There are Dvorak boards for single handed typists, left or right, so I may set one of those up for 4-8 weeks.

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