Trivia

Subject:
Re: Monday. Winter Doldrums
Response To:
Monday. Winter Doldrums ()

Frederick Nelson
>To stabilize a round ball, which was much easier to cast and prepare than a conical bullet, a long, slow twist to the rifling is required. Twists of one turn in 60 to 72 inches (or longer) were required. The longer barrel allowed a longer contact with the rifling to stabilize the ball.

The ball was patched with thick cloth, usually mattress-ticking or other light canvas that allowed a tight seal between the projectile and the bore. This tight seal, created during loading, made for significantly improved accuracy, which, as long as the shooter did his part, would put meat on the table.

The ball, once loaded, became more of a short cylinder with rounded ends, but capable of remarkable accuracy. In the right hands, it is comparable to modern breech-loading firearms.

FNelson
Under sunny skies in eastern Missouri.

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