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Re: that is a convincing argument

Barry Irby
I have a cheap General Brand set of plug cutters. Pretty sure I got them at Lowe's. 1/2", 3/8" & 1/4". The plugs they cut are very slightly tapered. With care you can cut plugs for a similar species of wood, flat grain. You can choose grain that matches the surrounding wood if the plug will be visible, flat sawn or quarter sawn or whatever. Then you drill a matching hole, slather in a little glue, insert the plug and tamp it home and trim the plug flush with a chisel or one of those flush cutting saws. and you are don with the repair.

When I set up to make them I make a few extra and keep them in a baggy. If I get a loose screw or sloppy hole, I have a few utility plugs on hand. I have used hundreds of them in old worn out door jambs. The flat grain ones work great, as good as new. I have also made a few repairs with whittled slivers and tooth picks. Don't have much confidence in those, just not as good. Have also tried dowels. Also not as good.

Just checked the Lowe's site and they have Milescraft ones similar to mine for under $20.

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