Hand Tools

Subject:
I get where you're going, by the way..
Response To:
Plane blade metrics ()

David Weaver
..why pick a specific relatively crude sharpening method and then see how thin the shaving is? It's a demonstration of edge uniformity with a very quick sharpening method that doesn't involve particularly fine abrasives.

It gives a good idea for an experienced woodworker how capable the iron will be after quick refreshing, and I use the term "experienced woodworker" to really mean someone doing a lot more than smooth planing or joint fitting (and recognize that's 95%+ of the market - people who don't really care about anything but longevity because they don't want to take planes apart, and they may not have a concept of why this sort of easy crispness is a gift).

Coupled with the other post - had I found that the V11 iron and others resisted damage better than older steels, the conclusion would've been different (then it would be easy to get the full benefit if their abrasion resistance and worth screwing around with burrs, etc). A beginner could sharpen the iron that I have on almost any finish stone, never know there was such a thing as a burr (Because it would leave without them noticing), do no stropping, and still get a shaving a half thousandth thick. That's a nice thing - they might conclude the iron "gets sharper" than other irons, which isn't really the case- it just gets sharper without doing the extra work or heading toward smaller and smaller abrasives like you'd need to do with higher alloyed irons.

3V, in the case of my testing, could roll a burr just doing the "ruler trick" between sessions. I don't really know if that was abraded material or if the edge was being burnished (I'd guess it was a burr, abraded material). I've not seen that before - it did it on 1 micron diamonds on cast. It can be worked off, but why is it there in the first place?

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