Hand Tools

Subject:
what plate thickness are you thinking..
Response To:
Interesting, but... ()

David Weaver
...for your frame saw?

When I made the resaw, I used heavier plate obviously, but it's suited to the purpose. I have .03, I think, 2" high, but that's too thick for joinery and not thick enough for resawing anything large (got the pleasure of hand filing a 47" blade with giant teeth into it to find that out, and still have that blade hanging waiting in case there's ever a reason I'd use a lighter resaw, but also have a big bandsaw blade to try that, too....

Anyway, I'm thinking that .025" 1095 is probably about right unless you can get spring temper 1080 or something. I'm not sure the big "whee" about the need for 1095 everywhere as hard as practical is that great, but rather a fascination with trying to stretch sharpening intervals because the people buying the saws can't sharpen them. I prefer something a step softer so that you can sharpen it all the time without killing files so fast.....

I need a nap and am not getting to the point, though - 1095 cost is way up. It was about $70 for 10 feet of the big stuff when I made a frame saw, and now that same coil is $150. I think I sold the remaining amount of that coil for not much (it's too big for your use) and am sorry that I didn't buy additional widths to make frame saw blades. We're shopping in an area that's usually sold as "shim stock" and anything that resembles frame saw blades is not much of a market for the steel.

I can tooth saw blades without issue when I have nothing else to do, but have had my fill if there is a blade with teeth in it already for the same or less than 1095 stock.

Same thought about the ece blade that came with my saw - it was overset, the steel is soft and rubbery and it can be made to use, but the chinese blades are much more "plain" and even if they are only about as hard to file, they file crisply and quickly.

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