Hand Tools

Subject:
limited ability for clean cutting...
Response To:
Interesting, but... ()

David Weaver
...I gather that the saw that frank uses depends on soft pine and the ability to tolerate blowout on the inside of the cut.

I found another use for my frame saw that I hadn't thought of before today while playing, and that is as a base for portaband bimetal blades. In the world of making chisels, I like the portaband to break down steel, but it's really hard on the teeth on a bimetal blade.

However, they can be cut into segments and there's enough in one portaband for the 700mm frame saw and for another smaller frame saw. This alleviates one of the bigger pains in breaking down old larger files - cutting them, and in the case of a bimetal hacksaw - it works well, but it's hard on the hands. If the swap over is done with a portaband, you get only a little cutting before something goes amiss and teeth fly off - the end is near at that point - $7 each for the blades. $1 in bulk for the lenox hacksaw blades. My stinginess makes me choose hand punishment.

So far in cutting a few things with the portaband blade in the ece frame saw, nothing broken - no broken teeth, much less hand pain, long stroke - you can feel what the blade does vs. having a 10 amp portaband go from smooth to click click.

on to your issue of needing joinery blades - 1095 stock isn't cheap the last I got it, and the stock that I received had a mill edge (which needs to be ground off unless you want to ruin a large file in one shot - the edge is rolled or something and work hardened or scale covered - whatever it is, it's file murder).

15 tpi is a pretty quick toothing job from a blank plate, but it's not a quick setting job. All of the chinese blades that I've found (a little softer than what we're used to but not rubbery and very easy filing - I Like them a lot) are shorter, so I have no ideas.

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