Hand Tools

Subject:
now you know...

David Weaver
..why I faffed around finding the failure angle for plane blades, and why I don't think it's 30 degrees.

XHP also does lack toughness somewhat, but the issue with stringy end grain isn't just a toughness issue, it's strength. You an manipulate the two variables like hamburger/cheesburger.

do you want lines on the work from folding or lines from chipping?

33 degrees or so is where this damage decreases a great amount and this is why when I was doing the iron test, I mentioned not caring that much about squeezing extra clearance out of a blade because doing so makes it more difficult to get practical extra footage without edge damage, and the edge damage greatly increases hone damage.

Same also was the impetus for the edge roll on stones that became the unicorn (though even those have to be managed based on material - if you have a pleasant softwood, as you found, the uni can crush fibers - the chisels as I sent them to you probably wouldn't have had a problem with cherry where I cut most dovetails but everything can be thinned back).

What you're seeing is also why tests like mine can present a biased answer. Yes, XHP lasted twice as long as O1 in clean wood. No, if you use the plane irons in varied situations, you can't get the same results (interrupted cuts, too much end grain, over joints with glue in them). starting a blade askew with a bump is the best way to limit edge damage, but when planing something like that, having a fast honing or fast grinding blade is even better.

In making daughter's bed last year, I used a lot of SYP and white pine. The cheap buck bros blades were dominant for that because of how fast they sharpened and how much better they stayed ahead of the damage without lengthening the sharpening cycle.

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beveled blades don't like end grain
now you know...
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