Hand Tools

Subject:
Sharpening...

David Weaver
They're initially sharp, but should actually be technically better once the backs get more than just quick treatment on sandpaper and india.

No kidding, they're:
* india stone on the bevel and back (fine india, but settled in) - maybe or maybe not with a wire teased off with light work on a mid-fineness novaculite stone (washita or dan's hard)
* 5 micron yellowcake on the buff. Don't spare the rod. bevel side only with only the fluff corner touching the back if it feels like there's any junk sticking to the back.

Also, no kidding, I could tell the sweetness from the sharpening process varied with hardness when I put the orignial article together. You can add sweetness to soft chisels by adding fine steps, but it's easier to make the chisel the right hardness to get the sweetness.

The V11 chisel was an outlier as it wasn't any sharper than the others, but it's slipperier. The strike counts showed that. I couldn't get it to hold together under heavy use as well as a hard carbon steel chisel, though.

It could still very well be better than my file chisels due to the fact that the steel has much excess carbide and I can't get it fully into solution like industrial process can.

Winston's pair, the narrow is not so bonkers hard, but the wider of the two chisels as I recall is bonkers hard. The settled in india stone tells the story. It sharpens hard chisels fine. It sharpens really really hard chisels a little slow. The difference between the two is probably no wider than the spec range used by most manufacturers, but it's noticeable.

(The hope with these chisels and their possibly larger grain is that the unicorn trick will shut out any failure that may have occurred pushing the limits with flat bevels, and that they're the right hardness to get a lot of sweetness out of the common bits used here - no need for extra fine stuff. I didn't use any extra fine stones, and didn't use any linde A or anything like that).

© 1998 - 2017 by Ellis Walentine. All rights reserved.
No parts of this web site may be reproduced in any form or by
any means without the written permission of the publisher.

WOODCENTRAL, P.O. BOX 493, SPRINGTOWN, PA 18081