Hand Tools

Subject:
different methods of lapping and the bump
Response To:
Coupla thoughts ()

David Weaver
this bump is something I've found on wooden planes.

The ugly cocobolo smoother that I showed a picture of developed the bump a couple of times. It's all the same wood, so i have to believe that it's influenced wedge and iron pressure (just iron pressure for the most part on japanese planes).

There's less tuning with a plane like that because it's for heavy work and double iron, but I think the appearance of the bump has ceased or been reduced greatly. Initially, it made the plane unusable within a short period of time before lapped off. The nature of this bump wasn't that it went away with the iron out, it was if it had been "bent" out settling that way. I eventually also started loosening the iron and wedge (and loosening the iron in japanese planes) if they were coming into the basement out of the garage (where I keep things that aren't in current use).

As far as lapping goes, the internet and communicating things is cumbersome. If one person says "get a flat surface and sand the sole of your plane with the paper affixed to the flat surface", you just can't control what someone does.

Over the years, I've come to find that if you have a long lap like mine and the lapping of the plane is done as if you're planing (Vs. swishing the plane back and forth or unintentionally rocking side to side), it works well. On a 24 inch wooden plane, the flatness issues will probably be a couple of thousandths. The more you have to do with a metal plane and the less easily the plane laps, at least in my experience, the more the bias will be toward making a greater error.

That said, not proposing that people should lap the soles of their japanese planes the way that I'm doing it (with the iron partially set) or even scraping the back and lapping the rest. If it's been done a certain way for a long time, that's probably the best way to do it.

I'll be curious enough to check lapping a japanese plane I haven't used in a while (there's another plane that needs to be lapped soon, anyway) with the iron in partial tension and then check with the iron in tension - there's enough less wood in a japanese plane and enough difference in how the iron is held, it's not hard to believe that the iron itself could reintroduce the bulge even after flattening the body.

Messages In This Thread

Light vs Heavy planes
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
not the direction I went *PIC*
5 1/4
Re: reframing the issue
Re: reframing the issue
Friction, and more
The experiment and conclusion are both confusing
Re: Heavy and light
The best case for heavy planes...
another factor
If you're trimming furniture...
At some point..
Inertia and figured wood
Re: Jim, what is Osae-gani? *NM*
Osae-gani
Re: Osae-gani
Note on fitting
Re:wedge fitting
funny...
Re: funny...
Re:wedge fitting
biases for the maker...
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
Not a positive contribution to the discussion
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
finding out who to listen to...
Re: Same
Old history
Shops using mostly hand tools..
Re: Shops using mostly hand tools..
Don felder's guitar...
Misprint?
cultural thing...
Re: Misprint?
Re: finding out who to listen to...
I agree...
Re: finding out who to listen to...
Turnover, newbies and FAQ
comment on teaching
If you get my drift...
Re: Light vs Heavy planes
new vs. old planes...
I like tools from Brooklyn
Re: I like tools from Brooklyn *NM*
Infills in the UK
I'm glad you commented.
Note on a modern infill
konrad's planes...
Re: I'm glad you commented.
what I've found...
Re: what I've found...
interesting that...
Re: Calling BS
I haven't seen it....
Re: I haven't seen it....
Re: I haven't seen it....
Re: I haven't seen it....
Re: I haven't seen it....
Truing Kanna
expanding on what jim said
Re: expanding on what jim said
Re: expanding on what jim said
Coupla thoughts
different methods of lapping and the bump
Re: Calling BS
Re: Facts, not assertions
Re: Facts, not assertions
I think we're agreeing...
Re: I think we're agreeing...
Re: Me too
Wood isn't indefinitely stable, either
Re: Calling BS
Re: Calling BS
Re: Calling BS
by the early 19th century
Re: by the early 19th century
It's not offered as ball court...
I miss Todd Hughes' contributions too *NM*
Re: It's not offered as ball court...
I'm guessing on parts here...
Re: Can't argue
Weight Comparison
more infill weights
Re: more infill weights
now there is a pearl of wisdom
Re: more infill weights
initial fitting...
one more follow-up comment.
Re: one more follow-up comment.
rosewood
Re: rosewood
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