Hand Tools

Subject:
Wiley you nailed it, I think
Response To:
Re: sources ()

Bill Tindall, E.Tn.
I am considering the possibility that your thoughts are spot on. The green stick is readily available, lasts for decades and works. Does it work better, as well or worse than just alumina or diamond.....?... so far we don't know. Most probably don't care. But I have a boundless curiosity and like to know about stuff I use, and can I make it better.

I am of the school, baring data to the contrary, that removing metal is simply removing metal, regardless of the means. Further I don't think that results from shaving has any relevance to sharpening a tool to cut wood, at least to my wood cutting standards. Not meaning to cast an unfavorable light on David's experience, but results of edge preparation for shaving with the response of blade to skin and hair seems a long way from driving a sharp edge into wood for the purpose of lifting up a slice of it so what remains is thinner.

Before someone advances the notion that this or than abrasive affects the remaining metal in some positive or negative way by how the metal atoms are arranged afterward, consider what is known about metal surface preparation for metallurgical examination. The idea in preparing these specimens is to reveal what the metal structure looks like, unaltered by surface preparation. Historically (decades ago, not 1827), this work was done with silicon carbide in the coarse grits and alumina in the final steps, at least in the lab I worked in occasionally. Now, as I understand it, diamond abrasive is used. Presumably the results are the same. The progression of grits is important; their composition is not.

Nothing is easier than ordering a green stick, and it works. The question is whether the combination of green and white is better than just white. Is the green there just because we have come to expect it? Do we need to be concerned that a green stick could be an abrasive mixture or that this stick has more green stuff than that, and hence is better?

Messages In This Thread

Is chromium oxide honing compound still relevant
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Visually similar *LINK*
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
That is what I am going to experiment with
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
Appearance...
Re: Appearance...
Re: Is chromium oxide honing compound still releva
to repeat the question....
Re: to repeat the question....
Re: to repeat the question....
Re: to repeat the question....
Re: to repeat the question.... *LINK*
Re: Good link, thanks. *NM*
sources
PS
Re: sources
Wiley you nailed it, I think
Diminishing returns
Re: Diminishing returns
Re: Diminishing returns
Re: Diminishing returns
Re: Diminishing returns
Re: Wiley you nailed it, I think
Green and white vs. white
Historical methods
Re: Historical methods
Re: Historical methods
Extrapolation of scenarios
Re: Extrapolation of scenarios
Re: Extrapolation of scenarios
I hope brian doesn't show up...
Re: I hope brian doesn't show up...
Enlighten me
No clue about historical..
Re: Enlighten me
A minerology lesson
Re: A minerology lesson
Re: A minerology lesson *LINK*
I stand corrected
Re: Enlighten me
The emphasis on speed...
What do I have?
Something called the ‘Koch System’
Historical yet again
Re: Something called the ‘Koch System’
The wax thing...
Re: The wax thing...
Re: Is chromium oxide vs aluminum oxide +...
Two questions remain
My opinion..
Marketing with the compounds...
G-456--not that it's practical
Or not...illegal to ship?
polishing stainless
Re: polishing stainless
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