Hand Tools

Subject:
Re: Question
Response To:
Re: Question ()

Derek Cohen (in Perth, Australia)
The way I'm visualizing this, having the legs shaped on all sides means they can only be clamped together while the first two opposing sides are shaped and the other 2 sides are still straight. Taking that approach, it would have to be done before bandsawing the last 2 sides, and it would be much more difficult to tape the bandsawn cutoffs back on to the shaped legs to stabilize them for their last two cuts on the bandsaw.

It might be possible to clamp the legs with a jig of some sort, but the effort might be more trouble than it's worth.

Is there some simpler way to think about this?

Denny, the simpler way is to begin with a template. The shape is arrived at via drawing and experimentation. I copy it onto 6mm MDF and cut this out.

The advantage of the template is that you can align it with the grain in the most desired manner, and you can create an identical outline of each leg.

Mark them out and roughly cut away the waste ...

Now you can shape them individually.

These are the legs from my recent sofa table. These legs had compound curves. I retained as many reference sides as possible until they were no longer needed. In the case of these legs, the inner and outer curves could be made immediately, and final shaping (to a third side) took place at the end.

The articles depicting these are here:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/SofaTable-Legs.html

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/TheBevelLiesInTheDetails.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

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