Hand Tools

Subject:
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....

Sgian Dubh
Hi Richard

How would you clean out the corner of these sockets without causing any damage using a straight chisel, such as a 1/8"?

I'd approach it the way I've always done it. In the description following, socket length runs with the grain, i.e., vertically in your picture, and socket depth runs across the grain, i.e., front to back (with the lap away from the viewer) in your picture.

Chop out the bulk of the waste using any preferred method after you've defined the rake of the pins with a saw. You can chisel it, bore it out with a drill; set up a router, small diameter cutter and side fence, whatever you prefer. That just leaves cutting the shoulder line across the grain accurately, trimming the side of the pin where the saw can't reach, and defining the depth of the socket.

After the bulk of the waste is removed I move on to defining the shoulder line accurately using the cutting gauge line as my guide. Usually I start with a narrow chisel, 6 or 10 mm all depending on the wood's hardness and resistance to cross grain paring, and make light cuts perpendicular to the wide face that take me up to the shoulder line. I drop that chisel and pick up the next wider chisel and extend the shoulder line using the existing flat created by the narrower chisel as my guide. I keep dropping chisels and picking up wider ones until I get to the corners where the pins are. I aim for perpendicular to the wide face, but quite commonly slightly undercut to ensure there's no gap at the shoulder when the joint's assembled.

At this point you have to start to angle the wide chisel to cut at the same, or slightly lower, rake angle as the pin's rake. This means a wide chisel can't cut right into the bottom corner because the tip furthest from the corner bottoms out on the inner face of the lap. So I drop that chisel and pick up a narrow chisel or chisels, perhaps a 6 mm chisel followed by on 3 mm wide, to get right into the corner, and slightly overcut into the lap.

Then it's a case of tidying up the pin where the saw couldn't reach when sawing to define the rake. A chisel of about the same width as the socket's length does this neatly through using the existing saw cut as a guide for the flat side of the chisel. Pare down across the grain or with it if that cuts neatly.

In all of this there's been nothing yet said about defining the depth of the socket, but here I pare with the grain using as wide a chisel as I can to get into the corner to meet where I chopped down across the grain to define the shoulder. Sometimes there's a bit of necessary cutting in two directions, i.e., with the grain and across the grain to get most of the corner neat, perhaps slightly undercut in both directions (which is preferable to leaving any high spots that would prevent the joint assembling tight to shoulder line and depth of socket)

That just leaves that awkward little corner to pick out, and where the narrow chisel severs off the little bit of grain left from paring with or across the grain on the pin and on the inside face of the lap.

Hopefully you can follow the description well enough. Unfortunately I don't record videos of this sort of thing, and I appreciate it would be much easier to follow the technique if I put up a wee five minute video, but I'm afraid I can't do that (or perhaps more accurately, it's not something I have any interest in doing at the moment - more work than I want to take on). It's much harder to describe than it is to do, which I seem to achieve without thinking about it much really. It's just a case of chop a bit, pare a bit, change chisel, do a bit more, clean out the corner, next, that sort of thing, try not to let your attention wander while you're at it because it's a pretty boring and repetitive procedure really if you've got something like a few drawers to make, ha, ha. Slainte.

Messages In This Thread

A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: Plus 1 for Skew Chisels
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Sounds better than it is!! (the offer).
Separate comment...
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: Fishtail not skew
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Seaton chisels
Re: Seaton chisels
:) *NM*
Re: Seaton chisels
Re: Seaton chisels *LINK*
Re: Seaton chisels
Re: Seaton chisels
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton tool chest book *PIC*
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton tool chest book *PIC*
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton tool chest book *PIC*
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton tool chest book
Re: Seaton chisels
Re: necessary vs. desirable
Re: necessary vs. desirable *PIC*
Besides grinding...
Re: Besides grinding...
Re: Besides grinding...
You had me go check...
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Ah ..ha
Re: Ah ..ha
Those are VERY nice dovetails, Richard :) *NM*
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
Re: A lands question for Rob Lee.....
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