Hand Tools

Subject:
Cliff Stamp
Response To:
Re: S30V at Rc58 ()

david weaver
I don't really know who cliff stamp is, but I got a comment from him on youtube at one point, because I asked if people thought a quarter inch convex grind knife that weighs almost a pound was a good thing to slice tomatoes with.

Brief conversation, I told him I ventured into the knife videos after watching something else, but the car wreck rubbernecking thing caused me to watch a few videos of people trying to cut the lip on a 55 gallon drum, as well as punching through sheet metal, etc.

I told cliff that I wasn't impressed with knives that are hard to sharpen but that lose their edge, and then tracked down his page. He had a large amount of testing that he'd done where he found that for one reason or another, a lot of the modern knives didn't deliver what their alloys should have (either the metal was low quality, the heat treating was low quality or the manufacturing after heat treat had rendered the knives a failure). They remained really difficult to sharpen.

As he described, few people actually use the knives they bought so such things can be sold and carried for a long time without anyone being wiser for it.

In my separate post re: S30V and counterterrorist knives, I sort of get the point if someone is actually walking around with a rifle and they carry their knives much and use them almost none. Though, not sure why they need to be S30V - the cheapest stainless at saw temper would be fine.

As for my buck knife that I was prepared to call a win for modern CPM154, I'll give it rust resistance, because I'm sure it has that. Aside from that, it's inferior to a knife made of the same steel as the butcher iron pictured in the pictures thread. And that's too bad. The natural order of conclusion so far YSS products (revise that to be of the simpler types since hitachi apparently makes all kinds of powder goods now) > good vintage steel > modern steel.

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