Hand Tools

Subject:
Re: We will be going 100% sharpening perv...

david weaver
They can - as you mentioned, and I've suggested to other people, just getting data or observation isn't very useful if you don't know that much about the subject.

I've dealt with a lot of people (and admittedly, I can be bullheaded and hard to convince) who believe that enthusiasm and new information is a substitute for experience. The thread about saw hardness that got carried away a couple of years ago was a good example. Saws in the 60s hardness were asserted with measurements on parts up to 70. Makes no sense, and neither does the assertion that we just want harder and harder saws - we have to file them at some point, and it's not much fun filing a saw that doesn't match the files very well.

Brent Beach is dismissive of other people, leads newbies into a trap of extravagant and super overwrought sharpening devices (that are ultimately very limiting), and has no clue about cap irons (and doesn't want to learn anything, either). that's OK, there are things I have written off, too, but all of us aren't infallible and those of us who get too consumed with the data end up being the easiest to prove wrong. It took me a long time as a beginner to pay attention to warren and george instead of the blogroll (actually, george was able to convince me that I didn't have much to offer, but should listen...and pretty quickly). Warren's words require the observer to supply interpolating information and effort, which I was a little slower to get to.

So, brent's got the data everywhere and is very certain of his conclusions, but they aren't something you'd see in a shop where people make things.

(having trouble making a point today) We're all responsible for actually using things we learn rather than just parroting them or drawing conclusions and dismissing experienced conclusions. I have no clue why Brent thinks shaptons aren't closely graded - they might be the most closely graded stones you can buy, and they have a heavenly feel to a sharpener who is not a beginner. I am guilty of going crazy about a decade ago buying every synthetic stone I could find, and they were my favorite because they're not fragile under an edge like some others. And if you buy the kuromaku from japan, they're cheap. What they've done to price abrasives to the US market (either them or their distribution) is another thing - that's a shame.

I bought and sold and now have two of them again - the pro orange and cream (kuromaku versions from japan). The pair with shipping was about $95. Maybe the most practical combination of synthetic stones you can find if you're just trying to do work with them.

I pondered the camera idea a little more, it makes more sense now that I've thought about it. I ogled my sister's cameras a couple of years ago (I'm sure they're out of date now - D4 or something (4, N4? who knows), overly complicated but I guess photographers looking for a write off can justify them). If you can get the lighting right, I'm assuming that some of those have high-resolution real time video and you could just do the same thing as you can with a microscope and a low-quality turret camera. but the latter is about $450, or $11 if you're willing to deal with hand held, and I think the camera body my sister praised was about $6K when new. It should make toast and choose your outfit for that price.

I still haven't gotten the software installed on my computer yet for the turret camera on my new microscope, but I'll get that done soon enough. That would seem a simple thing to most people, but my kids broke my DVD drive and my standalone drive cable is missing.

"getting the light situation worked out" is different for you and me. There's plenty of light in the metallurgical scope, but deciding what will actually look good is something else entirely, and then holding a razor at 25 degrees on a flat aluminum bed is something else (so far I've worked out a piece of O1 stock, a couple of magnets and maybe I'll stick a piece of paper to the opposite side of whatever I'm scoping. Everything has a learning curve, just like I thought it would be great to view something at 600x, but it's actually too much magnification for practical use, even in judging a razor edge.

Messages In This Thread

We will be going 100% sharpening perv...
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what microscope?
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Evaluation
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This thread has more tangents than...
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