Hand Tools

Subject:
Re: 20th century
Response To:
Re: 20th century ()

david weaver
It's not a criticism of people who use machines, it's a criticism of people who use a ramp to bowl and want to write a book about rolling a hook.

Or convince people who can roll a hook that a ramp is just as good.

The folks who want to do their joints with a machine are in a separate group, that's not what we're addressing. It's more the folks who have a ten step process for cutting a tenon rather than just cutting at the line and cleaning up only when necessary.

(the person who got me into woodworking gets strange pleasure out of setting up machines and then finding out that he has a tenon exactly 2 thousandths less than the mortise he's just machine cut...for "glue expansion". I have no idea if those numbers are right, but that's the kind of thing he talks about. I told him I hope to never expose a tenon (personal choice) or have any clue how many thousandths shy my tenons are of the mortise, because they're too rough to tell and I'd rather go with what feels right until I actually have one come loose - and even then, I'll probably revise that to one that comes loose and can't be easily fixed. My friend thinks that's preposterous).

Same with dovetail joints.

When someone is new, certainly you do what you need to do (I think learning to repair issues is probably more valuable than learning to be really really careful all the time, but to each their own). Having that as a standard to aspire to is a good way to not get much done.

The arguments are always relative. The guy with a kreg jig and shop cabinets and a guided circular saw can certainly tell us that we don't build many pieces very quickly. Things that keep a lot of people from making much in the shop, though, are those things such as the idea that a drawer will take 7 hours to make, or that it will take 9 minutes to sharpen.

© 1998 - 2017 by Ellis Walentine. All rights reserved.
No parts of this web site may be reproduced in any form or by
any means without the written permission of the publisher.

WOODCENTRAL, P.O. BOX 493, SPRINGTOWN, PA 18081