Hand Tools Archive

Subject:
the premise is different in this case

David Weaver
where I found the need for it was mortising cocobolo. You can be careful with technique and maybe save an edge set for mahogany and cherry or oak in cocobolo or purpleheart, but you'll punish yourself in work like that. if someone sets their tools for mahogany, let's say, they're not going to hold up even in ash unless they've unknowingly set them up a little strong for mahogany.

this got rekindled for me in lower quality chisels because of how sharp the patternmaker gouge gets and how strong the edge is in bulk work. It's beyond the level that any reasonable effort with oilstones will provide because of the fineness of the edge.

The cut resistance as it's set now for dovetail type work is less than what I would've typically done by hand.

It's true that it may save some of the trouble that folks have when they have bad technique, though, but it's too small of a replacement at the edge to tolerate prying and twisting. That'll just do as cliff stamp says for knives - push the failure up further past the point where the edge was adjusted.

The other reference here is when derek mentions dovetailing gidgee or something, macassar ebony comes to mind to me, too, with the purpleheart. People rarely work stuff like this, but when they do, they are led to believe by advertisements about hardness or toughness that they need to buy something. They don't need to - they can do this, have a temporary edge adjustment that's literally removable with the next hone. That part of it is nice.

It's also sharp enough to leave a waxy finish on incense cedar (but that's with the buffer, and it would take considerably longer to get an edge that fine hand stropping). When I cut all of half blinds on the last up and down case, I don't remember if I did it because it doesn't strike me as a situation where you'd need the help unless the chisel quality is low (and something like a sorby chisel is low enough that you can't get the edge to hold up just by making sure all strikes are straight in with a direct in line mallet blow and not flopping around, twisting or prying.

Messages In This Thread

Weaver chisel grind *PIC*
Some quick tests (lots of pictures) *PIC*
Some chisel pictures *PIC*
Re: Some chisel pictures
Re: Some chisel pictures *PIC*
astonished by picture quality *NM*
excellent pictures!
Another test *PIC*
Re: Another test
question
Re: question *PIC*
Re: question
could be a database issue...
Second try for picture *PIC*
yellow pine *NM*
Those pictures..
Nice piece of work
Re: Nice piece of work
Light source?
Re: Light source?
stitches.....
I've made a video.....
video...not for the meek...
It's a very funny video
comments on the two pictures.....
bevel width
It's the scale that escapes me
Re: It's the scale that escapes me
Looking forward to it, thanks! *NM*
More on the Weaver Bevel
Re: More on the Weaver Bevel
the premise is different in this case
I don't agree with limitation of your premise
You nailed it
This is hilarious
Jim - here's your guy
Well that escalated quickly.
Moving the needle
Re: Moving the needle *LINK*
Thanks for the memories *PIC*
Absolutely *LINK*
Positioning *LINK*
Where to find unhndled Narex chisels? *NM*
Taylor Tool Works
narex and their hardening....
how I achieved the Weaver Bever
Weaver Bevel
Further defining the Weaver Bevel
perception of penetration?
solving a problem, not creating one...
Re: solving a problem, not creating one...
BTW
rolling over edges....
On secrets, incantations and open source
Weaver grind—how is convexity added?
Marc Adams
Could've been felt...
Re: Weaver grind—how is convexity added?
The world is upside down :)
I took a nine day Sellers course
Re: I took a nine day Sellers course
it makes sense
How about making a video?
Period costume?
Re: How about making a video?
Trying things out
Re: Trying things out
Re: Trying things out
failed to figure things out...
Re: How about making a video?
Re: How about making a video?
variations on the already done...
thoughts *PIC*
Re: Weaver grind—how is convexity added?
Re: Weaver chisel grind
making peculiar names
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