Hand Tools Archive

Subject:
Every board unique
Response To:
planing failure ()

Wiley Horne
Hi Bill,

It sounds like you have a case of surfacing, or reversing, grain. For example, here is a soft maple board with reversing grain at 5 places along its length. I use it to check my planes before use:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/78661951@N07/49670996658/in/dateposted-public/

If you look up close, you see surfacing grain that’s fairly steep, like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/78661951@N07/49670996353/in/dateposted-public/

or fairly shallow like this:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/78661951@N07/49671535961/in/dateposted-public/

This latter place will produce a fairly wide tearout on the edge with the chipbreaker set back. And it’s because of the shallow grain angle that you point out.

These grain reversals are planeable with adequately-set Stanleys or LN’s, or Konrad’splanes. As I say, it’s a test board. But does that extrapolate to your walnut board? Surely not. David, in another nearby thread, makes the point that every situation is different. And so you deal with them as they come. On your walnut, if your best set-up, sharpest iron, and thinnest shaving won’t work, then I suggest approach from each side (with the grain), exiting the cut short of the grain reversal, and scrape or sand what’s left (if it won’t plane, it may not scrape either).

Wiley

© 1998 - 2017 by Ellis Walentine. All rights reserved.
No parts of this web site may be reproduced in any form or by
any means without the written permission of the publisher.

WOODCENTRAL, P.O. BOX 493, SPRINGTOWN, PA 18081