Messages Archive

Subject:
Pinakothek der Moderne - Part 2

Derek Cohen (in Perth, Australia)
I was very much looking forward to visiting the Bauhaus Museum. This has been a long-standing area of inspiration. Bauhaus was a German art school operational from 1919 to 1933 that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was arguably the single most influential modernist art school of the 20th century.

I arrived to discover that the Museum was closed for refurbishment, and would not re-open for a few years. In its place it had a temporary exhibition. I was very disappointed, to say the least. But this was to be made up by the exhibition at the Pinakothek der Moderne. Here are a few images from the Bauhaus exhibition as an introduction.

The Throst Carpet by Gertrud Arndt (1927)

The first Wassilly chair by Marcel Breuer. Originally named the 'B3 Chair', it was inspired by the use of tubular steel in the bicycle and Breuer's subsequent application of this material and technique to furniture revolutionised modern design and production ...

.. and a few more ...

This chair was the first I saw at the Pinakothek, and there were so many, many others. I shall limit my selection to ones which I think were important and you may enjoy ...

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1917)

and again (1903) ..

Here's a stool he did in 1897 with his wife (?) Margaret MacDonald Mackintosh ..

So "modern" in 1898 ... Richard Riemerschmid

Everyone's favourite ... Gerrit Thomas Rietveld's Zig-Zag chair, which dates to 1932 ...

Not exactly fine woodworking for the joinery :)

This chair comes from 1924 (Lynndy in the background) ..

.. and the sideboard from 1919 ...

The chair that is so well-known is his Red and Blue Chair from 1918 ...

This appears to precede it, from 1917 ...

The joinery looks to be dowels ...

This is by Hans and Wassili Luckhardt (ca 1930) ...

The S-Chair by Eileen Gray (1932) ...

.. and of course THE chaise loungue by Le Corbusier (1928) ...

A sideboard by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann (1928) ...

Not one of his more fancy pieces, and the photo does not do it justice (too many reflections). The cabinet doors are smoked glass.

The Eames brothers - Ray and Charles - were there, naturally. I use one of their office chairs at my desk in my office. This one was not on display ...

... but this one was:

Lastly, there was Hans Wegner. I have one of his Round Chairs at home, and built a replica of this a few years back. Mine on the left and Hans' on the right ...

... so you will understand I am a fan. Here is his Egg Chair (left) and Shell Chair (right) ..

Thanks for joining me on this journey. But stick around - there is a Part 3 coming.

Regards from Munich

Derek

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